Perhaps you are a bit confused about the names Myanmar and the Ayeyarwady River. Long known as Burma and the Irrawaddy River, the names were changed back from the Colonial designations to the traditional Burmese pronunciations after 1990. Similar changes were initiated for Bagan [formerly Pagan] and Yangon [formerly Rangoon] as well as the country’s administrative capital being relocated to Naypyidaw, some 200kms/120miles north of Yangon.

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Yet the mystique of Myanmar – its scenery and people, has led it to be named “The Number One Tourist Destination” by travel industry polls and consumer publications for 2015. And it remains in the top three favoured worldwide destinations heading into 2016.
The Ayeyarwady, the lifeline of the country, flows from its origin in the peaks of the Himalayas below Tibet, courses through the remote jungle-covered highlands to emerge in the sun-drenched plains of central Myanmar and finally south into the Andaman Sea. The trip of over 2,170kms/1,350 miles earns it the title of the longest river in Myanmar and the 23rd longest in Asia.

The name “Ayeyarwady” is believed to have derived from the Sanskrit term “airavati”, meaning “Elephant River” with the elephant frequently associated as a water icon in Buddhism. As early as the sixth century, the river was used for trade and transport. Having developed an extensive network of irrigation canals, the river became an important pipeline to the British Empire after it had colonized Burma. The river is just as vital today, moving a considerable amount of export goods and traffic. The Ayeyarwady Delta is the “rice bowl” of the country, irrigated by water from the river.

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With the largest cabin space on the Ayayarwady and the highest crew to passenger ratio, The Anawrahta offers the finest on-board experience in Myanmar. Named after King Anawrahta, the 11th-century founder of the Burmese nation, the Anawrahta is modeled after a turn-of-the-century vintage steamer mixing Burmese motifs and British colonial-style décor. The 23-cabins are on four levels, Deluxe [16]; Junior Suites [3]; Executive Suites [2] and sumptuous Royal Suites [2] with their own spacious balconies and private Jacuzzis. The ship also features a bar, lounge, restaurant, spa, gym and Jacuzzi plunge-pool.

The Anawrahta joins the Heritage family of five other ships – two classic river cruisers, Jayavarman and Jahan, on the Mekong and three royal junks in Ha Long Bay – our flowers Ginger, Jasmine and Violet.

To see more details of our itinerary to Burma, please visit our website: heritage-line.com; call us at: +84 (0) 8 377 385 55, or email: sales@heritage-line.com